Where to Land Mars 2020: A Conversation with Ken Farley

Ken Farley, the project scientist for NASA's next Mars rover, a mission called Mars 2020, and the W.M. Keck Foundation Professor of Geochemistry at Caltech, talks about how the Mars 2020 landing site selection process is shaping up.

Developmental Biologist Eric H. Davidson Passes Away

Eric Harris Davidson, Caltech's Norman Chandler Professor of Cell Biology, passed away on Tuesday, September 1, 2015. He was 78 years old.

Making Nanowires from Protein and DNA

Using computational and experimental methods, researchers at Caltech have developed a technique for creating so-called protein–DNA nanowires—a hybrid biomaterial that could have important applications.

Farthest Galaxy Detected

Caltech researchers have reported the detection of the farthest object yet, galaxy EGS8p7. At more than 13.2 billion years old, it provides a fascinating glimpse of the very early universe, just 600,000 years after the Big Bang.

Eric H. Davidson, 1937–2015

Eric Harris Davidson, Caltech's Norman Chandler Professor of Cell Biology, passed away on Tuesday, September 1, 2015. He was 78 years old. An obituary will be posted shortly.

Deformation of 3D Hierarchical Nanolattices

Researchers in the laboratory of Caltech's Julia Greer have designed a new kind of hierarchical nanostructure that is stronger than previous lattice structures and bounces back with less damage after compression.

Yung Receives Prize for Planetary Science Research

Yuk Yung, the Smits Family Professor of Planetary Science, has received the 2015 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize from the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences.

Why Did Western Europe Dominate the Globe?

For centuries, the countries of western Europe colonized and conquered much of the rest of the world; Caltech's Philip Hoffman has a new explanation for why history unfolded in this way.

New, Ultrathin Optical Devices Shape Light in Exotic Ways

Caltech engineers have created flat devices capable of manipulating light in ways that are very difficult or impossible to achieve with conventional optical components.

Seeing Quantum Motion

Even large objects obey quantum physics, meaning they are never quite at rest. Caltech researchers have developed a way to detect—and manipulate—this underlying quantum motion.

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